REIKIKU (A POETIC FORM)

I had received a reiki treatment recently for some various aches and ailments I have been experiencing. Reiki is a therapy often described as palm healing or hands-on-body healing in which a practitioner places hands lightly on or over a patient’s body to facilitate the patient’s process of healing. Reiki combines the Japanese and Chinese word-characters of “rei” (spiritual or supernatural) and “ki” (vital energy). A basic idea held by those who practice Reiki is that this vital energy can be channeled to support the body’s natural ability to heal itself. However, there is no scientific support to these claims that this so-called vital energy actually exists, or that there is conclusive evidence Reiki is useful for any health-related purpose. That doesn’t mean it’s a harmful practice.

As Ann Baldwin, (a professor of physiology at the University of Arizona and a trained Reiki master, or practitioner) states “Reiki can do no harm — the worst thing it can do is nothing.”

In spite of all that, I felt better after my treatment. Relaxed. I felt no stress and no anxiety so for me, that “nothing” was something.

***

Reiki as a poetic form? In homage to the haiku, I envision the Reikiku in that vein – a seventeen syllable channeling of energy or spirit to ease one’s heart, stress anxiety or emotion. Untitled,  is written in four lines with a 5,5,4,3-syllable count. Any rhyme incorporated is purely discretionary. It begins with the trouble you look to ease and works toward that end.

My example of Reikiku:

Weariness of heart
Finds its peace through love
Within oneself
Peace will come.

© Walter J. Wojtanik

I WILL POEM FOR FOOD

Buddy, can you spare a rhyme?
I’m down on my luck and someone stuck
a slug in my hat. That and a hearty sestina
won’t buy me a cup of coffee.
But if you’re interested, might I show you
this string of haiku written just for you…
or maybe you could say thank you to a nice tanka
or pantoum. Would you swoon over this sonnet
if I put your name on it? A villanelle would go swell
with your shoes, or you can choose to have me
get satirically lyrical on you. I can let you have
a triolet for a song. You can’t go wrong!
Thanks anyway. You know, starving poets need love too!
I’m tols I’m sort of good! I will poem for food!
Hey! Hey Buddy, can you spare a rhyme?

(C) Walter J Wojtanik

Poetic Asides 2017 April P.A.D. – Day 11: Sonnet/Anti-form

 

BOKETTO AS A POETIC FORM

I thank my poetic friend, Meena Rose for introducing me to the concept of Boketto. I have been thinking about how to translate this into a poetic form.

Boketto is a Japanese word that really doesn’t translate into English very well. The idea behind Boketto is staring at the sky or into the distance without a thought… Getting lost in one’s own self; removing the self from a place mentally. There is no regard to the past and no concern for the future. There is only THIS moment. The Boketto can be a very personal poem, or can be one of a random observation.

The Boketto consists of two stanzas, One of five lines (30 syllables – 7,7,7,4,5) and a three line (17 syllables – two seven syllable lines and a three syllable line which becomes a refain if a string of Boketto are written).

A variation of the Boketto makes use of two (three) ancient Japanese forms, the Tanka and the Haiku (Senryu). The moment of which you write will determine the choice. (Haiku – nature; Senryu – anything else).

Example:
WHITE NOISE

The air is filled with static,
a bombardment of senses
meant to irritate; annoy.
There is no joy,
this moment must cease.

I must escape in my mind,
hoping to find inner peace.
No relief.

© Walter J Wojtanik, 2014

Variation on Boketto:

SOLACE IN SELF

I am imprisoned,
lost in this moment in time.
I am writing rhyme
hoping to vacate this shell
and become one with my words.

not a sound is heard
silence becomes an ally
setting the soul free

© Walter J Wojtanik, 2014